We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health

We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health
Makeba Giles

Makeba Giles

Content Creator and Curator at MELISASource
Makeba Giles is an Health, Family, and Lifestyle Blogger. She is also a Midwest Mother of four, and the Founder and Creative Director of MELISASource.com. |

EMAIL: [email protected]
Makeba Giles

It’s is no secret that periods, like women, come in all shapes and sizes. What is considered a normal period for one woman may not be normal for another. Even so, there is a distinct difference between what is classified as a normal and abnormal menstrual cycle. It can be difficult for a woman to tell these differences on her own.

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We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health

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That is why it is important for women to keep open and honest lines of communication open between themselves and their healthcare providers when it involves their uterine health. Withholding any questions regarding heavy periods or other areas of reproductive health can lead to serious issues down the line.

Heavy menstrual bleeding can mean more than a heavy cycle. It can lead to other issues that impact heath and quality of life. Conditions such as:

  •                 Extreme fatigue and body chills due to anemia (low iron levels in the body)
  •                 Lightheadedness            
  •                 Severe headaches
  •                 Nausea
  •                 Heavy cramping/abdominal pain
  •                 Severe depression, moodiness, and anxiety

One in five women will experience heavy periods in her lifetime. The effects of heavy periods can interrupt normal daily activities, and impair overall quality of life. Unfortunately, many women suffer with heavy periods in silence, unaware that there are steps that can be taken to turn things around.

There are two truths about uterine health that all women everywhere should understand:

  • Heavy periods and the conditions that can ensue are not normal
  • There are a variety of lifestyle changes and treatment options that can help make a difference

It is evident that more awareness is needed of the serious health problem of heavy periods. That is why Hologic has launched the #ChangeTheCycle initiative. Change the Cycle is a women’s health initiative and community. The mission is to encourage women to share conversation about uterine health, and to provide advice and encouragement to those living with heavy periods.

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The latest campaign of the #ChangeTheCycle initiative is #DareToWearWhite, which challenges women to wear white lipstick and/or clothing as a ‘conversation starter’ about women’s health issues such as heavy periods. I was very proud to partner with Change the Cycle and Hologic during their exhibit at this year’s BlogHer conference in Los Angeles.

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Change the Cycle and Hologic BlogHer16 #ChangeTheCycle #DareToWearWhite We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health
At BlogHer16 in Los Angeles

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Change the Cycle and Hologic BlogHer16 #ChangeTheCycle #DareToWearWhite We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health
Booth 601 at #BlogHer16 featuring Change the Cycle and Hologic

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Booth 601 at #BlogHer16 featuring Change the Cycle and Hologic We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health
Courtesy white lipstick and lip liner were available for #BlogHer16 attendees at the Change the Cycle Hologic booth

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#DareToWearWhite and #ChangeTheCycle of Discussing Uterine Health
I loved my ‘white lipstick makeover’ to raise awareness uterine health at the Change the Cycle and Hologic booth during #BlogHer16!

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The booth featured free makeovers, discussion boards, Q&A sessions with women’s health experts, and much more!

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Change the Cycle and Hologic BlogHer16 #ChangeTheCycle #DareToWearWhite We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health
Inspiration board at #BlogHer16 with Change the Cycle and Hologic

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Change the Cycle and Hologic BlogHer16 #ChangeTheCycle #DareToWearWhite We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health
Women’s health Q&A board at #BlogHer16 with Change the Cycle and Hologic

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Change the Cycle and Hologic BlogHer16 #ChangeTheCycle #DareToWearWhite We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health
Expert Q&A session with Change the Cycle and Hologic

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I learned valuable information to help me to be proactive and fearless in taking control of my own issues with my menstrual cycle, and consult with my doctor to determine which treatment options would be best for me.

It is a known fact that women’s health issues aren’t discussed enough, and that women may sometimes feel uneasy sharing items of concern with their healthcare provider. That’s why I am so glad to have partnered with Hologic and the Change the Cycle initiative. Not only do I feel more empowered in my own uterine health, I am now inspired to help other women in my community as well.

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Change the Cycle

Booth 601 at #BlogHer16 featuring Change the Cycle and Hologic We Need to Start Having More Open Discussions About Uterine Health Join me and #DareToWearWhite to raise awareness about uterine health. Visit www.changethecycle.com to learn more about the signs and symptoms of heavy periods, as well as when to talk with your doctor about possible treatment options. There’s also a symptom checklist printable for use during your next office visit. Additionally, communicate online with other women who are living with—and want to manage—their heavy periods by connecting with Change the Cycle on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and by following the hashtags #ChangeTheCycle and #DareToWearWhite.

uterine health

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19 Comments

  • Hologic did a great job with their campaign initative at BlogHer! Yes i feel like we dont talk about uterine health as often as we should its almost brushed under the rug so thanks for sharing and bringing up more awareness.

  • My sister always had a wild and crazy period while mine was always right on the dot. It’s true, there needs to be more open discussion about it.

  • I am one of the 5 that experience heavy periods and often wonder if my ulcerative colitis isn’t a contributing factor. I tried to bring it up with my doctor who brushed me off and told me to take Tylenol and I’d be fine. I think it’s time to find a new doctor who will take me seriously. Heavy periods hurt and can really dampen your week!

  • So much important information you’ve included in this post – thank you! I’m really up for the idea of people being more open about discussing women’s health (especially uterine health).

  • This was a really informative post. I think that it’s important to talk about something that is so natural. This is definitely information I would want my daughter to know!

  • Uterine health is so important, but so many women act like it’s something we can’t talk about. I don’t know how it happened, but it seems like women are always nervous or embarrassed about talking about their breasts or anything that goes on below the waist. Great, GREAT event.

  • This sounds like an awesome event. I can’t believe that women STILL feel embarrassed when talking about their own bodies. I know so many women who do, though.

  • This is great information for all women and teens. My daughter recently started her cycle which makes me even more interested in learning about uterine health for her health

  • I can 100% relate to this. I’ve suffered from heavy periods most of my life and I thought that’s just how it was for me and without any real knowledge about it, I developed anemia which I still have. I remember always taking naps and not being able to get out of the bed from fatigue and having periods so strong that every time I stood up or even moved a little while sitting I had to make a trip to the bathroom. And you would think that these things would be red flags but it’s not talked about hardly and I hope that this discussion will help others who are suffering in silence or like me, don’t know any better or what to do about it.

    I love the white lipstick idea and the walls of inspiration and questions. I wish these were at every doctor’s office. Thank you so much for bringing awareness about this subject.

  • This is such an important conversation that we need to have as women with each other and with our daughters. The more we speak about it the less stigma there will be around it and the easier it will become to normalize it. Thank you so much for sharing this resource!

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