Expert Advice: What Women Can Do Now to Prevent Osteoporosis

Makeba Giles

Makeba Giles

Content Creator and Curator at MELISASource
Makeba Giles is an Health, Family, and Lifestyle Blogger. She is also a Midwest Mother of four, and the Founder and Creative Director of MELISASource.com. |

EMAIL: melisasource@yahoo.com
Makeba Giles

Osteoporosis is often called the silent disease because bone loss occurs gradually over time. Unfortunately, the impact of this deadly disease is far from quiet.

Nearly 56 million American adults have osteoporosis or low bone density. Each year, osteoporosis causes two million broken bones in the U.S. alone. These fractures result in more than half a million hospitalizations, more than 800,000 ER visits, more than 2.6 million trips to the doctor, and the placement of nearly 200,000 individuals into nursing homes. This serious disease threatens 1 out of 2 women over the age of 50, and complications of hip fracture cause more deaths among women each year than breast cancer.

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DID YOU KNOW:

  • 4 out of 5 people with osteoporosis are women
  • 70% of fractures happen in people over 65
  • Nearly thirty million women in America are at risk for osteoporosis
  • It is estimated that 50% of women older than 50 years will sustain an osteoporotic fracture, whereas an estimated 13% will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime
  • Women who have bone density scans have 35% fewer hip fractures than those who do not

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May is National Osteoporosis Month, and is also the perfect time for women to contact their healthcare provider to ask about a bone density scan to diagnose osteoporosis and help prevent fractures. That is why the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), the leading health organization and non-profit dedicated to preventing osteoporosis, is taking the month of May to encourage women to take a proactive approach in their health in order to “Break Free” from osteoporosis.

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Expert Advice: What Women Can Do Now to Prevent Osteoporosis

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There is startling new data that suggests the problem of osteoporosis and low bone mass is projected to significantly rise in coming years. The unnerving part is that a large event does not need to happen for osteoporosis to occur. As bones become weak they may break from a minor fall or, in serious cases, even sneezing or bumping into furniture.

Dr. Andrea Singer, Clinical Director with the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), joined me to discuss more details about the new data, and offer helpful tips for osteoporosis prevention.

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Take a look at our chat below.

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A full list of risk factors, along with more information about osteoporosis, visit:  www.boneawareness.com.

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Meet Our Guest:

 

Andrea Singer, MD, FACP, CCD, is associate professor and chief, Division of Women’s Primary Care and director of bone densitometry, in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital. Dr. Singer’s clinical areas of expertise are women’s primary care, osteoporosis, bone densitometry, osteoporosis, secondary fracture prevention, menopause, sexual health and medical and gynecologic disease. She is board certified in internal medicine and is a certified clinical densitometrist for interpretation of bone density testing. Dr. Singer is also clinical director of the National Osteoporosis Foundation. In addition, Dr. Singer has established a post-fracture care program at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital.

Osteoporosis

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1 Comment

  • At age 40 I was diagnosed with osteopenia. I fired that doctor because he couldn’t read the T Scores and just casually wrote me a prescription for Fosamax, at that time the most invasive drug. I don’t believe in prescriptions and do anything I am able to avoid them. This usually means tweaking my diet, exercise plan and mindfulness practices. I’ve been following saveourbones.com for years whose ideas fit into my self-advocacy approach. UP until this year, I stayed there. Because I took Prilosec for acid reflux for 18 months, at least this is my assessment from research, my bone density test moved so much closer to osteoporosis. Thanks for sharing Dr Singers message.

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